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PRODUCT SUMMARY

Vitamin E 400 IU Plus Mixed Tocopherols Softgels 100% Natural (180 Count)

Availability: In stock
Stock Number :VIT-500-SG-180
  • General Health and Wellness
  • Heart Health – Cardiovascular Support
  • Hair – Skin – Nails
  • Beauty Health
  • Bone, Joint, and Musculoskeletal
  • Quick Notes:

    • Natural source vitamin E from soy!
    • Shown to be more potent than synthetic forms!
    • Our mixed natural tocopherol Vitamin E contains many of the important variations of this antioxidant ensuring great absorption!
    • Fat soluble antioxidant offering superior cellular protection!
    • Stabilizes cellular structure and inhibits damage!
    • A potent free radical scavenger!
    • Great for cardiovascular support!
    • Contains mixed tocopherols!
    • Non-esterified form!
    • Convenient, easy-to-swallow softgel!
       

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    List Price: $50.17

    Price: $29.95

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    Product Information

    Quick Notes:

    • Natural source vitamin E from soy!
    • Shown to be more potent than synthetic forms!
    • Our mixed natural tocopherol Vitamin E contains many of the important variations of this antioxidant ensuring great absorption!
    • Fat soluble antioxidant offering superior cellular protection!
    • Stabilizes cellular structure and inhibits damage!
    • A potent free radical scavenger!
    • Great for cardiovascular support!
    • Contains mixed tocopherols!
    • Non-esterified form!
    • Convenient, easy-to-swallow softgel!
       

    Overview:

    Vitamin E is an essential nutrient and potent fat soluble antioxidant. It is vital to the stability and integrity of cellular tissues and membranes in the body. It is stored in fat tissue and the liver.

    Vitamin E occurs as a class of compounds termed, tocotrienols and tocopherols. These tocotrienols and tocopherols have four major forms: alpha, beta, delta, and gamma. Alpha tocopherol is the most common and biologically active form of Vitamin E. However, current research indicates each variant may have unique benefits. For example, scientists postulate that alpha tocopherol inhibits production of free radicals while gamma tocopherol neutralizes existing free radicals.

    Our Vitamin E with Mixed Tocopherols 400 IU is from a natural source and contains all four members of the tocopherol family of compounds, making it more nutritionally complete. A natural form of Vitamin E is the most powerful and effective form of the antioxidant because it is the easiest form for your body to absorb. The Vitamin E used by our facility is derived from soybean oil and is significantly more potent than synthetic Vitamin E.
     

    Research Indicates:

    • Powerful antioxidant
    • May support healthy eyes
    • Assists in the formation of red blood cells
    • Important nutrient for healthy cardio function
    • Supports healthy immune system function
    • Supports healthy skin and hair growth
    • Helps the body make optimal use of Vitamin A and Iron
    • May promotes health for burns, eczema and other skin problem
    • Protects fatty acids in the body
    • Prevents oxidation of LDL cholesterol

    Ingredients

    d-delta tocopherols

    d-gamma tocopherols

    natural d-alpha tocopherol

    Vitamin E

    Suggested Use: Take 1 softgel daily with food. • Vitamin E should be taken with meals that contain fat to increase absorption and lower the risk of stomach irritation.

    Storage:

    Keep in a cool, dry place.

    Allergy Warnings:

    This product is contraindicated for individuals with hypersensitivity to any of its ingredients.

    Interactions:

    • Everyone has unique body chemistry. All patients should be aware of potential drug and supplement interaction. You are encouraged to consult with your primary health care professional before taking any supplement product.

    • If you are taking blood thinning medications, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), aspirin, lipid lowering drugs, statins, or chemotherapy agents please consult with your primary health care professional before taking this product.

    • Vitamin E is generally non-toxic when taken in doses less than 1200 IU per day.

    • In doses more than 1200 IU per day it may cause nausea, gas, diarrhea, and heart palpitations.

    • High doses of Vitamin E may interfere with Vitamin K activity.

    • If you have an overactive thyroid, diabetes, hypertension, rheumatic heart disease, are taking prescription blood thinners or aspirin, or are pregnant or lactating, consult a health care practitioner before taking Vitamin E.

    Pregnancy Warning:

    If you are pregnant, nursing, have any health condition, or are taking any medications please consult with your health care practitioner before using this product.

    Keep out of reach of children.

    Disclaimer:

    • The following scientific literature references, articles, and statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
    • This product is not intended to treat, cure or prevent any disease.
    • Information about this product is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.
    THANKS!
    1. Jiang L, Yang KH, Tian JH, et al. Efficacy of antioxidant vitamins and selenium supplement in prostate cancer prevention: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutr Cancer. 2010;62(6):719-727.

    2. Evans JR, Henshaw K. Antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplements for preventing age-related macular degeneration. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(1):CD000253.

    3. Fotuhi M, Zandi PP, Hayden KM, et al. Better cognitive performance in elderly taking antioxidant vitamins E and C supplements in combination with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: the Cache County Study. Alzheimers Dement. 2008;4(3):223-227.

    4. Hemila H, Virtamo J, Albanes D, et al. The effect of vitamin e on common cold incidence is modified by age, smoking and residential neighborhood. J Am Coll Nutr. 2006;25:332-339.

    5. Eidelman RS, Hollar D, Hebert PR, et al. Randomized trials of vitamin E in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:1552-1556.

    6. Meydani SN, Leka LS, Fine BC, et al. Vitamin E and respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2004;292:828-836.

    7. Shahar E, Hassoun G, Pollack S. Effect of vitamin E supplementation on the regular treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004;92:654-658.

    8. Avery NG, Kaiser JL, Sharman MJ, et al. Effects of vitamin E supplementation on recovery from repeated bouts of resistance exercise. J Strength Cond Res. 2003;17:801-809.

    9. Drisko JA, Chapman J, Hunter VJ. The use of antioxidant therapies during chemotherapy. Gynecol Oncol. 2003;88:434-439.

    10. Michaud DS, Pietinen P, Taylor PR, et al. Intakes of fruits and vegetables, carotenoids and vitamins A, E, C in relation to the risk of bladder cancer in the ATBC cohort study. Br J Cancer. 2002;87:960-965.

    11. Hodis HN, Mack WJ, LaBree L, et al. Alpha-tocopherol supplementation in healthy individuals reduces low-density lipoprotein oxidation but not atherosclerosis: the Vitamin E Atherosclerosis Prevention Study (VEAPS). Circulation. 2002;106:1453-1459.

    12. Graat JM, Schouten EG, Kok FJ. Effect of daily vitamin E and multivitamin-mineral supplementation on acute respiratory tract infections in elderly persons: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2002;288:715-21.

    13. Taylor HR, Tikellis G, Robman LD, et al. Vitamin E supplementation and macular degeneration: randomized controlled trial. BMJ. 2002;325:11.

    14. Desnuelle C, Dib M, Garrel C, et al. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. ALS riluzole-tocopherol Study Group. Amyotroph Lateral Scler Other Motor Neuron Disord. 2001;2:9-18.

    15. Manzella D, Barbieri M, Ragno E, et al. Chronic administration of pharmacologic doses of vitamin E improves the cardiac autonomic nervous system in patients with type 2 diabetes. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;73:1052-1057.

    16. Brand C, Snaddon J, Bailey M, et al. Vitamin E is ineffective for symptomatic relief of knee osteoarthritis: a six month double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study. Ann Rheum Dis. 2001;60:946-949.

    17. Masaki KH, Losonczy KG, Izmirlian G, et al. Association of vitamin E and C supplement use with cognitive function and dementia in elderly men. Neurology.2000;54:1265-1272.

    18. Helzlsouer KJ, Huang HY, Alberg AJ, et al. Association between alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, selenium, and subsequent prostate cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst.2000;92:2018-2023.

    19. Leppala JM, Virtamo J, Fogelholm R, et al. Vitamin E and beta carotene supplementation in high risk for stroke. A subgroup analysis of the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. Arch Neurol. 2000;57:1503-1509.

    20. Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium and Carotenoids. National Academy Press; 2000.

    21. Ford ES, Sowell A. Serum alpha-tocopherol status in the United States population: findings from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination study. Am J Epidemiol. 1999;150:290-300.

     22. Labriola D, Livingston R. Possible interactions between dietary antioxidants and chemotherapy. Oncology. 1999;13:1003-1012.

    23. Woodson K, Tangrea JA, Barrett MJ, et al. Serum alpha-tocopherol and subsequent risk of lung cancer among male smokers. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999;91:1738-1743

    24. Liede KE, Haukka JK, Saxen LM, et al. Increased tendency towards gingival bleeding caused by joint effect of alpha-tocopherol supplementation and acetylsalicylic acid. Ann Med. 1998;30:542-546.

    25. Traber MG, Elsner A, Brigelius-Flohe R. Synthetic as compared with natural vitamin E is preferentially excreted as alpha-CEHC in human urine: studies using deuterated alpha-tocopheryl acetates. FEBS Lett. 1998;437:145-148.

    26. Barton DL, Loprinzi CL, Quella SK, et al. Prospective evaluation of vitamin E for hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. J Clin Oncol. 1998;16:495-500

    27. Heinonen OP, Albanes D, Virtamo J, et al. Prostate cancer and supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene: incidence and mortality in a controlled trial.J Natl Cancer Inst. 1998;90:440-446.

    28. McBride JM, Kraemer WJ, Triplett-McBride T, et al. Effect of resistance exercise on free radical production. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998;30:67-72.

    29 White E, Shannon JS, Patterson RE. Relationship between vitamin and calcium supplement use and colon cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1997;6:769-774.

    30. Meydani SN, Meydani M, Blumberg JB, et al. Vitamin E supplementation and in vivo immune response in healthy elderly subjects. A randomized controlled trial.JAMA. 1997;277:1380-1386.

    31. Ocke MC, Bueno-de-Mesquita H, Feskens EJ, et al. Repeated measurements of vegetables, fruits, beta-carotene, and vitamins C and E in relation to lung cancer. The Zutphen Study. Am J Epidemiol. 1997;145:358-365.

    32. Sano M, Ernesto C, Thomas RG, et al. A controlled trial of selegiline, alpha-tocopherol, or both as treatment for Alzheimer's disease. N Engl J Med. 1997;336:1216-1222.

    33. Rapola JM, Virtamo J, Haukka JK, et al. Effect of vitamin E and beta-carotene on the incidence of angina pectoris. JAMA. 1996;275:693-698.

    34. Kim JM, White RH. Effect of vitamin E on the anticoagulant response to warfarin. Am J Cardiol. 1996;77:545-546.

    35. Omenn GS. Micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) as cancer-preventive agents. IARC Sci Publ. 1996;139:33-45.

    36. Parkinson Study Group. Impact of deprenyl and tocopherol treatment on Parkinson's disease in DATATOP patients requiring levodopa. Ann Neurol. 1996;39:37-45.

    37. Albanes D, Heinonen OP, Huttunen JK, et al. Effects of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene supplements on cancer incidence in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1995;62(suppl):1427S-1430S.

    38. Bostick RM, Potter JD, McKenzie DR, et al. Reduced risk of colon cancer with high intake of vitamin E: the Iowa Women's Health Study. Cancer Res. 1993;53:4230-4237.

    39. Paolisso G, D'Amore A, Galzerano D, et al. Daily vitamin E supplements improve metabolic control but not insulin secretion in elderly type II diabetic patients.Diabetes Care. 1993;16:1433-1437.

    40. London RS, Murphy L, Kitlowski KE, et al. Efficacy of alpha-tocopherol in the treatment of the premenstrual syndrome. J Reprod Med. 1987;32:400-404.







































































































































































































































































































































































































































    FAQ

    Frequently Asked Questions - Letter Vitamins - E

    • What are vitamins?

      Vitamins are naturally occurring compounds present in foods. The human body cannot create vitamins and therefore has to acquire them via the diet or supplements. Vitamins are essential for all body functions including: obtaining energy from food, supporting growth, repairing tissues, maintenance of health, and general wellness.

       

    • Why are vitamins important?

      Our bodies utilize vitamins on a daily basis. These vitamins are critical for biochemical processes that maintain life. Vitamins play important roles in obtaining energy from our food, supporting growth, healing, and repair. A continuous deficiency in vitamins will lead to a serious deterioration in health, weakness, susceptibility to disease, and may lead to death.

    • How many vitamins are there?

      Thirteen vitamins have been identified: A, B (8 variations) C, D, E, and K. B complex vitamins are as follows: Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B3 (Niacin), Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid), Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine), Vitamin B7 (Biotin), Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid), and Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin).

    • What is the difference between water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins?

      Vitamins are divided into two groups: water-soluble and fat-soluble.

      As the name implies, water-soluble vitamins such as most B and C vitamins dissolve in water. They are easily taken up and released by body tissues. Daily replenishment of these water soluble nutrients is important because the body cannot store them.

      Fat-soluble vitamins such as Vitamin A, D, E and K dissolve in fat. These vitamins are absorbed along with fat. Excess fat-soluble vitamins may be stored in the body fat and liver therefore several weeks' supply may be consumed in a single dose or meal.

    • What is vitamin E and what does it do?

      Vitamin E is a fat-soluble nutrient found in many foods. In the body, it acts as an antioxidant, helping to protect cells from the damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are compounds formed when our bodies convert the food we eat into energy. People are also exposed to free radicals in the environment from cigarette smoke, air pollution, and ultraviolet light from the sun.

       

      The body also needs vitamin E to boost its immune system so that it can fight off invading bacteria and viruses. It helps to widen blood vessels and keep blood from clotting within them. In addition, cells use vitamin E to interact with each other and to carry out many important functions

    • What is vitamin E and what does it do?

      Vitamin E is a fat-soluble nutrient found in many foods. In the body, it acts as an antioxidant, helping to protect cells from the damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are compounds formed when our bodies convert the food we eat into energy. People are also exposed to free radicals in the environment from cigarette smoke, air pollution, and ultraviolet light from the sun.

      The body also needs vitamin E to boost its immune system so that it can fight off invading bacteria and viruses. It helps to widen blood vessels and keep blood from clotting within them. In addition, cells use vitamin E to interact with each other and to carry out many important functions.
       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Am I getting enough vitamin E?

      The diets of most Americans provide less than the recommended amounts of vitamin E. Nevertheless, healthy people rarely show any clear signs that they are not getting enough vitamin E
       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • What is the IU/mg equivalents for vitamin E?

      - 1 IU d-alpha tocopherol = .67 mg
      - 1 mg d-alpha tocopherol = 1.49 IU
      - 1 IU d-alpha tocopheryl acetate = .74 mg
      - 1 mg d-alpha tocopheryl acetate = 1.36 IU
      - 1 IU d-alpha tocopheryl succinate = .83 mg
      - 1 mg d-alpha tocopheryl succinate = 1.21 IU

       

    • What is the oil commonly used in vitamin E products?

      It comes from soy oil. Because soy is considered a highly refined oil, there are no proteins (which contain the portion of the plant that may be allergenic for some people).Additionally, because there is no protein portion, it is PCR (polymerase chain reaction) negative for genetically modified organisms.

    • How do you tell the difference between a natural and synthetic form of alpha tocopherol (vitamin E)?

      Unlike many vitamins whose synthetic form is “nature identical,” synthetic vitamin E is not the same as natural vitamin E. Vitamin E is primarily composed of four tocopherols: alpha, beta, gamma and delta. Alpha tocopherol, the most active variety, can be synthetic or natural. This is indicated with the letters “d” and “l.” The natural and most potent form, written as d-alpha tocopherol, is taken up preferentially by our tissues. The synthetic form, written as dl-alpha tocopherol, has lower biological activity and is less absorbable because the “l” portion is not recognized as vitamin E by the body. All of our vitamin E-containing products feature only the natural form.

      It is important to note that the terms acetate and succinate do NOT determine whether alpha tocopherol is natural or synthetic. Acetate and succinate are carriers of natural vitamin E used to stabilize and protect it from oxidative damage. Acetate is the esterified oil form, while succinate is the esterified dry form. As opposed to its “raw” oil state, the dry form of d-alpha tocopherol is used for putting it into tablets and hard gelatin capsules.

       

    • What do the terms water soluble and water dispersible mean?

      Water soluble components “disappear” in water. An example of this is sugar or salt in water.

      When mixed with water, a water dispersible component forms a fairly homogenous mixture that is not clear or colorless. The dispersed component is visible throughout the water. The stability of water dispersion can vary widely. Continuous mixing may not be necessary to maintain the dispersion. Eventually separation will occur. A water miscible component is not soluble in water.

    • Is the addition of a carrier necessary to the oil form of natural d-alpha tocopherol?

      The oil form of our natural vitamin E products is sealed in airtight softgels. This prevents the product (through the Best By date) from going rancid since the contents are not exposed to air. Theoretically, a carrier does not have to be added to our oil form of d-alpha tocopherol because softgel encapsulation provides sufficient protection at least through our Best By date. We use the form acetate in one of our natural vitamin E products (#120) solely to provide a choice for our customers. Keep in mind that all of our products have Best By dating to guarantee freshness and potency.

       

    • What is the oil used in all of the vitamin E products?

      It is soy oil. Because soy is considered a highly refined oil, there are no proteins (which contain the portion of the plant that may be allergenic for some people).Additionally, because there is no protein portion, it is PCR (polymerase chain reaction) negative for genetically modified organisms.

       

    • What is the difference between a soy allergy and an allergy to soy protein?

      If a consumer has been diagnosed with a soy allergy, products without any soy ingredients (including soybean oil) are a more appropriate choice. However, most soy allergies are actually allergies to soy protein.Soybean oil does not contain soy protein. Thus, for individuals with a soy protein allergy, products containing soybean oil should be well tolerated.If a consumer is not sure if they have a soy allergy, encourage them to consult a health care practitioner.

    • What residual amount of soy protein is left in the Vitamin E?

      There is no soy allergen (protein) in the product. Vitamin E comes from soy oil only.

    • What happens if I don't get enough vitamin E?

      Vitamin E deficiency is very rare in healthy people. It is almost always linked to certain diseases where fat is not properly digested or absorbed. Examples include Crohn's disease, cystic fibrosis, and certain rare genetic diseases such as abetalipoproteinemia and ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED). Vitamin E needs some fat for the digestive system to absorb it.

      Vitamin E deficiency can cause nerve and muscle damage that results in loss of feeling in the arms and legs, loss of body movement control, muscle weakness, and vision problems. Another sign of deficiency is a weakened immune system.
       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • How much vitamin E do I need?

      The amount of vitamin E you need each day depends on your age. Average daily recommended intakes are listed below in milligrams (mg) and in International Units (IU). Package labels list the amount of vitamin E in foods and dietary supplements in IU.

       

      Life Stage

      Recommended Amount

      Birth to 6 months

      4 mg (6 IU)

      Infants 7–12 months

      5 mg (7.5 IU)

      Children 1–3 years

      6 mg (9 IU)

      Children 4–8 years

      7 mg (10.4 IU)

      Children 9–13 years

      11 mg (16.4 IU)

      Teens 14–18 years

      15 mg (22.4 IU)

      Adults

      15 mg (22.4 IU)

      Pregnant teens and women

      15 mg (22.4 IU)

      Breastfeeding teens and women

      19 mg (28.4 IU)

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Are vitamin E supplements safe?

      It is very difficult to take too much vitamin E despite the fact it is a fat-soluble vitamin.

      According to some studies adult participants have taken 800-900 IU daily of vitamin E for lengthy periods of time without side effects. Most vitamin E supplements contain much less at around 100-400 IU. That is well below the threshold where people experienced minor issues such as stomach discomfort. People who are taking medication should check with their health care practitioner before taking high doses of vitamin E.

    • Are there any interactions with vitamin E that I should know about?

      - Vitamin E dietary supplements can interact or interfere with certain medicines that you take. Here are some examples:
      - Vitamin E can increase the risk of bleeding in people taking anticoagulant or antiplatelet medicines, such as warfarin (Coumadin®).
      - In one study, vitamin E plus other antioxidants (such as vitamin C, selenium, and beta-carotene) reduced the heart-protective effects of two drugs taken in combination (a statin and niacin) to affect blood-cholesterol levels.
      - Taking antioxidant supplements while undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy for cancer could alter the effectiveness of these treatments.

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