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PRODUCT SUMMARY

Vitamin B-Complex - Phytonutrient Based Veg Tabs (90 Count)

Availability: In stock
Stock Number :VIT-210-VT-090
  • General Health and Wellness
  • Heart Health – Cardiovascular Support
  • Cognitive Support
  • Eye Health and Visual Support
  • Energy Support
  • Immune Support
  • Weight Management
  • Quick Notes:

    • Ultimate Phytonutrient Based B-Complex features eight (8) high potency - water soluble B vitamins!
    • Our product is formulated in a phytonutrient base of brown..

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    Quick Notes:

    • Ultimate Phytonutrient Based B-Complex features eight (8) high potency - water soluble B vitamins!
    • Our product is formulated in a phytonutrient base of brown rice bran, greens, bee pollen, bioflavonoids, cruciferous and sea vegetables, carrots, parsley, fruits, and fruit pectin, safflower, ginger, and fennel!
    • The special combination food base helps the body absorb nutrients and provides key support factors naturally found in these foods!
    • B Vitamins are essential for a healthy metabolism, energy production, nervous system, and skin!
    • When taken together B vitamins work synergistically and optimize the benefit!
    • Phytonutrient base supports assimilation and provides naturally occurring Essential Fatty Acids, Amino Acids, Fiber, Bioflavonoids, plant pigments, and enzymes!
    • Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) for energy support!
    • Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) plays a key role in metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins!
    • Vitamin B3 (Niacin) for circulatory support and blood vessel wellness. Supports healthy cholesterol levels and energy!
    • Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid): supports metabolism and adrenal function!
    • Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) for immune support!
    • Vitamin B7 (Biotin) supports metabolism of food for energy. Promotes healthy skin, hair, and nails!
    • Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid) for fetal development support including spine and brain development!
    • Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) supports healthy nerves and red blood cells. Effectively supporting cardiovascular and mental function!
    • Vegetarian!
       

    Overview:

    Phytonutrient Based B-Complex vitamins are coenzymes involved in energy metabolism. They help in conversion of carbohydrates to glucose and also play a role in fat and protein metabolism. B Vitamins may be helpful in promoting a healthy mood.

    This B-Complex is formulated in a phytonutrient base of brown rice bran, greens, bee pollen, bioflavonoids, cruciferous and sea vegetables, carrots, parsley, fruits, and fruit pectin, safflower, ginger, and fennel.

    The special combination food base helps the body absorb nutrients and provides key support factors naturally found in these foods.

    B Vitamins are essential for the normal functioning of the nervous system and are helpful during stress and fatigue by maintaining energy levels. Generally B vitamins should be taken together. Nevertheless certain disorders may require specific B vitamins.

    The B-basic formula provides or exceeds recommended daily requirements of all B-vitamins. Since all B vitamins are water soluble, any excess in the body is excreted via urine. The ability to absorb vitamins efficiently decreases with age, therefore it is particularly important for elderly people to maintain an adequate intake of B vitamins. 

     

    Research Indicates:

    Thiamin:

    • Shown to support healthy circulation
    • Necessary nutrient for metabolism of carbohydrates and fats
    • Important for normal brain function
    • Used by professionals in the treatment of herpes zoster
    • Essential to normal growth and development
    • May support healthy appetite
    • Shown to have antioxidant properties
    • Needed for good muscle tone of intestines, stomach and heart
    • Aids digestion by assisting in the production of hydrochloric acid
    • Helps to maintain a healthy nervous system
       

    Riboflavin:

    • May support healthy energy levels
    • Essential for a healthy nervous system and brain
    • Aids in production of thyroid hormone
    • Acts as an antioxidant
    • May support a healthy mood
    • May support healthy vision
    • Vital for tissue repair and wound healing
       

    Niacin (Vitamin B3):

    • May support cardiovascular health and cholesterol balance
    • Important to the health of all tissue
    • Helpful in supporting healthy blood sugar balance
    • May support healthy joint function
    • May support a healthy mood
    • Involved with other B vitamins in the production of physical energy
    • Needed for healthy production of hydrochloric acid and secretion of bile and stomach fluid
    • Necessary for the healthy manufacture of sex and adrenal hormones
    • Maintains healthy skin, nervous system, and gastrointestinal tract
    • Shown to prevent pellagra
       

    Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine HCl):

    • May support cardiovascular health
    • May support a healthy mood
    • May support restful sleep
    • Supports optimal nervous system function
    • Aids in maintaining sodium and potassium balance
    • May lessen symptoms associated with PMS
    • May support healthy immune function
    • Necessary for the production of hydrochloric acid ensuring healthy digestion
    • Shown to reduce intensity of asthma attacks
    • Folate (Folic Acid)
    • Necessary for the production of both DNA and RNA
    • Essential for proper cellular division and the transmission of the genetic code to all newly formed cells
    • Essential for the health of red blood cells and the production of proteins and various amino acids
    • Crucial for closure of the fetus’ neural tube during pregnancy, thereby it is essential for preventing neural tube birth defects such as spina bifida
    • May support cardiovascular health
    • May support a healthy mood Folate, vitamin B12 and vitamin B6 have been shown to support healthy brain function in older adults
    • In mouthwash form may offer treatment for inflammation of the gums, or gingivitis
    • May support healthy immune function
    • In mouthwash form may offer treatment for inflammation of the gums, or gingivitis
       

    Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin):

    • Important for cardiovascular health
    • Needed for proper calcium absorption
    • May support healthy immune function
    • Important for maintaining healthy energy levels
    • Helps to ensure healthy brain function
    • Necessary for proper protein synthesis
    • Assists in the utilization of iron
    • Required for proper digestion
    • Necessary to form red blood cells, thus helping to prevent anemia
    • Helps to form the protective covering that surrounds the nerves
    • Essential for carbohydrate and fat metabolism
    • May support a healthy mood
       

    Biotin:

    • Important for hair, skin and nail health
    • Required for synthesis of fatty acids
    • Assists in converting food to energy
    • Contributes to health of sex glands and sweat glands
    • Essential nutrient for carbohydrate metabolism
    • Helps to maintain a healthy nervous system
    • Involved in transformation of amino acids into protein
    • Promotes normal cell growth
       

    Pantothenic Acid:

    • May help reduce symptoms associated with stress
    • Supports proper adrenal function
    • Essential for metabolism of protein, fat and carbohydrates
    • Promotes normal growth and development
    • Important for healthy nervous system function
    • Shown to speed wound healing
    • Involved in the manufacture of red blood cells
       

    Choline Bitartrate:

    • Important for metabolizing fat and cholesterol
    • Essential for healthy nervous system function
    • May support healthy liver function
    • Important for helping the body manufacture cell membranes
    • May support healthy brain function
    • Important for maintaining healthy energy levels
       

    Inositol:

    • Helps metabolize fat and cholesterol
    • May support a healthy mood
    • May support healthy liver function
    • Important nutrient for healthy nerve transmissions
       

    Para-Aminobenzoic Acid (PABA):

    • Necessary for the utilization of folic acid
    • Important for the metabolism of protein
    • Possesses antioxidant properties
    • Assists in healthy red blood cell formation
    • Protects against sunburn
    • Helps maintain healthy intestinal flora
    • Useful in the treatment of vitiligo

    Ingredients

    Bee Pollen

    Bioflavonoids

    Biotin

    Vitamin H

    coenzyme R

    or Vitamin B7

    Breens

    Brown Rice Bran

    Carrots

    Chlorella

    Choline

    Cruciferous And Sea Vegetables

    Folic Acid or Vitamin B9

    Fruit Pectin

    Fruits

    Ginger (root)

    Inositol

    Magnesium

    Niacin

    Vitamin B3

    or niacinamide

    Pantothenic Acid

    Vitamin B5

    d-calcium pantothenate

    Parsley

    Proprietary Phytonutrient Blend

    Prune

    Riboflavin

    Safflower

    Spirulina

    Thiamin or Vitamin B1

    vitamin b12 or cyanocobalamin

    vitamin b6 or pyridoxine

    Suggested Use: Take 2 tablets daily with a meal.

    Storage: Keep in a cool, dry place.

    Allergy Warnings: This product is contraindicated for individuals with hypersensitivity to any of its ingredients.

    Interactions:

    • Everyone has unique body chemistry. All patients should be aware of potential drug and supplement interaction. You are encouraged to consult with your primary health care professional before taking any supplement product.

    • If you are on any chemotherapy regimen please consult with your primary health care professional before taking this product. Certain B vitamins may interfere with some chemo regimens.

    • This product contains multiple ingredients. Please refer to the individual vitamin or mineral product page for interaction information. Always consult with your primary care professional before taking any supplement product.

    • Check with your health care practitioner if you have any of the following: diabetes, low blood pressure, glaucoma, gout, liver disease, ulcers or a bleeding disorder prior to using Niacin.

    • The following individuals may need to increase their intake of Vitamin B6: alcohol drinkers, cigarette smokers, women taking oral contraceptives, persons who take antibiotics, persons taking antidepressants, and persons who consume high amounts of protein.

    Pregnancy Warning: If you are pregnant, nursing, have any health condition, or are taking any medications please consult with your health care practitioner before using this product.

    Keep out of reach of children.

    Disclaimer:

    • The following scientific literature references, articles, and statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
    • This product is not intended to treat, cure or prevent any disease.
    • Information about this product is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.
    THANKS!
    Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

    1. Gold M, Hauser RA, Chen MF. Plasma thiamine deficiency associated with Alzheimer's disease but not Parkinson's disease. Metab Brain Dis. 1998;13:43-53.

    2. Schoenen J, Jacquy J, Lenaerts M. Effectiveness of high-dose riboflavin in migraine prophylaxis. A randomized controlled trial. Neurology. 1998;50:466-470.

    3. Bettendorff L, Mastrogiacomo F, Wins P, et al. Low thiamine diphosphate levels in brains of patients with frontal lobe degeneration of the non-Alzheimer's type. J Neurochem. 1997;69:2005-2010.

    4. Mimori Y, Katsuoka H, Nakamura S. Thiamine therapy in Alzheimer's disease. Metab Brain Dis. 1996;11:89-94.

    5. Shimon I, Almog S, Vered Z, et al. Improved left ventricular function after thiamine supplementation in patients with congestive heart failure receiving long-term furosemide therapy. Am J Med. 1995;98:485-490.

    6. Meador K, Loring D, Nichols M, et al. Preliminary findings of high-dose thiamine in dementia of Alzheimer's type. J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 1993;6:222-229.

    7. Seligmann H, Halkin H, Rauchfleisch S, et al. Thiamine deficiency in patients with congestive heart failure receiving long-term furosemide therapy: A pilot study. Am J Med. 1991;91:151-155.


    Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

    1. Schoenen J, Jacquy J, Lenaerts M. Effectiveness of high-dose riboflavin in migraine prophylaxis. A randomized controlled trial. Neurology. 1998;50:466-470.

    2. Tang AM, Graham NM, Saah AJ. Effects of micronutrient intake on survival in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. Am JEpidemiol. 1996;143:1244-1256.

    3. Sperduto RD, Hu TS, Milton RC, et al. The Linxian cataract studies. Two nutrition intervention trials. Arch Ophthalmol. 1993;111:1246-1253.


    Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

    1. Goldberg RB, Jacobson TA. Effects of niacin on glucose control in patients with dyslipidemia. Mayo Clin Proc. 2008;83:470-478.

    2. Elam MB, Hunninghake DB, Davis KB, et al. Effect of niacin on lipid and lipoprotein levels and glycemic control in patients With diabetes and peripheral arterial disease. The ADMIT Study: a randomized trial. JAMA. 2000;284:1263-1270.

    3. Polo V, Saibene A, Pontiroli AE. Nicotinamide improves insulin secretion and metabolic control in lean type 2 diabetic patients with secondary failure to sulphonylureas.Acta Diabetol. 1998;35:61-64.

    4. Guyton JR, Goldberg AC, Kreisberg RA, et al. Effectiveness of once-nightly dosing of extended-release niacin alone and in combination for hypercholesterolemia. Am J Cardiol. 1998;82:737-743.

    5. Jonas WB, Rapoza CP, Blair WF. The effect of niacinamide on osteoarthritis: a pilot study. Inflamm Res. 1996;45:330-334.

    7. Doyle W, Crawford MA, Wynn AH, et al. The association between maternal diet and birth dimensions. J Nutr Med. 1990;1:9-17.

    8. O'Hara J, Jolly PN, Nicol CG. The therapeutic efficacy of inositol nicotinate (Hexopal) in intermittent claudication: a controlled trial. Br J Clin Pract. 1988;42:377-383.

    9. Canner PL, Berge KG, Wenger NK, et al. Fifteen year mortality in Coronary Drug Project patients: Long-term benefit with niacin. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1986;8:1245-1255.

    10. Petrie WM, Ban TA. Vitamins in psychiatry. Do they have a role? Drugs. 1985;30:58-65.

    11. Newbold HL, Mosher LR. Niacin and the schizophrenic patient. Am J Psychiatry. 1970;127:535-536.


    Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)

    1. Huang SC, Wei JC, Wu DJ, Huang YC.Vitamin B(6) supplementation improves pro-inflammatory responses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Eur J Clin Nutr.2010;64(9):1007-1013.

    2. Aisen PS, Schneider LS, Sano M, et al. High-dose B vitamin supplementation and cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2008;300(15):1774-1783.

    3. Schwammenthal Y, Tanne D. Homocysteine, B-vitamin supplementation, and stroke prevention: from observational to interventional trials. Lancet Neurol. 2004;3:493-5

    4. Miodownik C, Cohen H, Kotler M, Lerner V. Vitamin B 6 add-on therapy in treatment of schizophrenic patients with psychotic symptoms and movement disorders.Harefuah. 2003;142:592-6,647.

    5. Lerner V, Kaptsan A, Miodownik C, et al. Vitamin B6 in treatment of tardive dyskinesia: a preliminary case series study. Clin Neurpharmacol. 1999;22:241-243.

    6. Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu FB, et al. Folate and vitamin B6 from diet and supplements in relation to risk of coronary heart disease among women. JAMA. 1998;279:359-364.

    7. Diegoli MS, da Fonseca AM, Diegoli CA, et al. A double-blind trial of four medications to treat severe premenstrual syndrome. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 1998;62:63-67

    8. Tang AM, Graham NM, Saah AJ. Effects of micronutrient intake on survival in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. Am J Epidemiol. 1996;143:1244-1256.

    9. van der Wielen RP, de Groot LC, van Staveren WA. Dietary intake of water soluble vitamins in elderly people living in a Western society (1980-1993). Nutr Res. 1994;14:605-638.

    10. Sur S, Camara M, Buchmeier A, et al. Double-blind trial of pyridoxine (vitamin B6) in the treatment of steroid-dependent asthma. Ann Allergy. 1993;70:147-152.

    11. Sandyk R, Pardeshi R. Pyridoxine improves drug-induced parkinsonism and psychosis in a schizophrenic patient. Int J Neurosci. 1990;52:225-232.

    12. Ubbink JB, Vermaak WJ, Delport R, et al. The relationship between vitamin B6 metabolism, asthma, and theophylline therapy. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1990;585:285-294.

    13. Kant AK, Block G. Dietary vitamin B-6 intake and food sources in the US population: NHANES II, 1976-1980. Am J Clin Nutr. 1990;52:707-716.

    14. Rimland B, Callaway E, Dreyfus P. The effect of high doses of vitamin B6 on autistic children: a double-blind crossover study. Am J Psychiatry. 1978;135:472-475.

    15. Bennink HJ, Schreurs WH. Improvement of oral glucose tolerance in gestational diabetes by pyridoxine. Br Med J. 1975;3:13-15.


    Vitamin B7 (Biotin)

    1. Singer GM, Geohas J. The effect of chromium picolinate and biotin supplementation on glycemic control in poorly controlled patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized trial. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2006;8:636-43. .

    2. Hochman LG, Scher RK, Meyerson MS. Brittle nails: response to daily biotin supplementation. Cutis. 1993;51:303-305.

    3. Maebashi M, Makino Y, Furukawa Y, et al. Therapeutic evaluation of the effect of biotin on hyperglycemia in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. J Clin Biochem Nutr. 1993;14:211-218.

    4. Colombo VE, Gerber F, Bronhofer M, et al. Treatment of brittle fingernails and onychoschizia with biotin: scanning electron microscopy. J Am Acad Dermatol.1990;23:1127-1132.

    5. Krause K-H, Bonjour JP, Berlit P, et al. Biotin status of epileptics. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1985;447:297-313.


    Inositol

    1. Palatnik A, Frolov K, Fux M, et al. Double-blind, controlled, crossover trial of inositol versus fluvoxamine for the treatment of panic disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol.2001;21:335-339.

    2. Chengappa KN, Levine J, Gershon S, et al. Inositol as an add-on treatment for bipolar depression. Bipolar Disord. 2000;2:47-55.

    3. Fux M, Benjamin J, Belmaker RH. Inositol versus placebo augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder: a double-blind cross-over study. Int J Neuropsychopharmcol. 1999;2:193-195.

    4. Wattenberg LW. Chemoprevention of pulmonary carcinogenesis by myo-inositol. Anticancer Res. 1999;19:3659-3661.

    5. Dong Z, Huang C, Ma WY. PI-3 kinase in signal transduction, cell transformation, and as a target for chemoprevention of cancer. Anticancer Res. 1999;19:3743-3747.

    6. Ishikawa T, Nakatsuru Y, Zarkovic M, et al. Inhibition of skin cancer by IP6 in vivo: initiation-promotion model. Anticancer Res. 1999;19:3749-3752.

    7. Shamsuddin AM, Vucenik I. Mammary tumor inhibition by IP6: a review. Anticancer Res. 1999;19:3671-3674.

    8. Benjamin J, Agam G, Levine J, et al. Inositol treatment in psychiatry. Psychopharmacol Bull. 1995;31:167-175.


    Folic Acid (Vitamin B9)

    1. De-Regil L, Fernandez-Gaxiola A, Dowswell T, Pena-Rosas J. Effects and safety of periconceptional folate supplementation for preventing birth defects. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(10):CD007950.

    2. Gamble MV, Liu X, Slavkovich V, et al. Folic acid supplementation lowers blood arsenic. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;86:1202-1209.

    3. Gilbody S, Lightfoot T, Sheldon T. Is low folate a risk factor for depression? A meta-analysis and exploration of heterogeneity. J Epidemiol Community Health.2007;61:631-637.

    4. Cole BF, Baron JA, Sandler RS, et al. Folic acid for the prevention of colorectal adenomas: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2007;297:2351-2359.

    5. Hernandez-Diaz S, Werler MM, Walker AM, et al. Folic acid antagonists during pregnancy and the risk of birth defects. N Engl J Med. 2000;343:1608-1614.

    7. Zhang S, Hunter DJ, Hankinson SE, et al. A prospective study of folate intake and the risk of breast cancer. JAMA. 1999;281:1632-1637.

    8. den Heijer M, Brouwer IA, Bos GMJ, et al. Vitamin supplementation reduces blood homocysteine levels: a controlled trial in patients with venous thrombosis and healthy volunteers. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1998;18:356-361.

    9. Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu FB, et al. Folate and vitamin B 6 from diet and supplements in relation to risk of coronary heart disease among women. JAMA. 1998;279:359-364.

    10. den Heijer M, Brouwer IA, Bos GMJ, et al. Vitamin supplementation reduces blood homocysteine levels: a controlled trial in patients with venous thrombosis and healthy volunteers. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1998;18:356-361.

    11. Graham IM, Daly LE, Refsum HM, et al. Plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for vascular disease. The European Concerted Action Project. JAMA. 1997;277:1775-1781.

    12. Alpert JE, Fava M. Nutrition and depression: the role of folate. Nutr Rev. 1997;55:145-149. 8. Heimburger DC. Localized deficiencies of folic acid in aerodigestive tissues. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1992;669:87-96.

    13. Koblin DD, Tomerson BW, Waldman FM, et al. Effect of nitrous oxide on folate and vitamin B 12 metabolism in patients. Anesth Analg. 1990;71:610-617.

    14. Milunsky A, Jick H, Jick SS, et al. Multivitamin/folic acid supplementation in early pregnancy reduces the prevalence of neural tube defects. JAMA. 1989;262:2847-2852.

    16. Botez MI. Folate deficiency and neurological disorders in adults. Med Hypotheses. 1976;2:135-140.


    Vitamin B12

    1. Dietary supplement fact sheet: B12. Office of Dietary Supplements website. (http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional)

    2. Malouf R, Grimley Evans J. Folic acid with or without vitamin B12 for the prevention and treatment of healthy elderly and demented people. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;CD004514.

    3. Ting RZ, Szeto CC, Chan MH, et al. Risk factors of vitamin B12 deficiency in patients receiving metformin. Arch Intern Med. 2006;166:1975-9.

    4. Bauman WA, Shaw S, Jayatilleke E, et al. Increased intake of calcium reverses vitamin B 12 malabsorption induced by metformin. Diabetes Care. 2000;23:1227-1231.

    5. Louwman MW, van Dusseldorp M, van de Vijver FJ, et al. Signs of impaired cognitive function in adolescents with marginal cobalamin status. Am J Clin Nutr.2000;72:762-769.

    6. Baig SM, Qureshi GA, Minami M. The interrelation between the deficiency of vitamin B 12 and neurotoxicity of homocysteine with nitrite in some of neurologic disorders. Biogenic Amines. 1998;14:1-14.

    7. Teunisse S, Bollen AE, van Gool WA, et al. Dementia and subnormal levels of vitamin B 12: Effects of replacement therapy on dementia. J Neurol. 1996;243:522-529.

    8. van Goor L, Woiski MD, Lagaay AM, et al. Review: cobalamin deficiency and mental impairment in elderly people. Age Ageing. 1995;24:536-542.

    9. Pennypacker LC, Allen RH, Kelly JP, et al. High prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in elderly outpatients. J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992;40:1197-1204.

    10. Yaqub BA, Siddique A, Sulimani R. Effects of methylcobalamin on diabetic neuropathy. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 1992;94:105-111.

    11. Reynolds EH. Multiple sclerosis and vitamin B 12 metabolism. J Neuroimmunol. 1992;40:225-230.

    12. Dagnelie P, van Staveren WA, van den Berg H. Vitamin B-12 from algae appears not to be bioavailable. Am J Clin Nutr. 1991;53:695-697.

    13. Kieburtz KD, Giang DW, Schiffer RB, et al. Abnormal vitamin B 12 metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus infection. Association with neurological dysfunction.Arch Neurol. 1991;48:312-314.

    FAQ

    Frequently Asked Questions - Letter Vitamins - B

    • What are vitamins?

      Vitamins are naturally occurring compounds present in foods. The human body cannot create vitamins and therefore has to acquire them via the diet or supplements. Vitamins are essential for all body functions including: obtaining energy from food, supporting growth, repairing tissues, maintenance of health, and general wellness.

    • Why are vitamins important?

      Our bodies utilize vitamins on a daily basis. These vitamins are critical for biochemical processes that maintain life. Vitamins play important roles in obtaining energy from our food, supporting growth, healing, and repair. A continuous deficiency in vitamins will lead to a serious deterioration in health, weakness, susceptibility to disease, and may lead to death

    • How many vitamins are there?

      Thirteen vitamins have been identified: A, B (8 variations) C, D, E, and K. B complex vitamins are as follows: Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B3 (Niacin), Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid), Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine), Vitamin B7 (Biotin), Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid), and Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin).

    • What is the difference between water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins?

      Vitamins are divided into two groups: water-soluble and fat-soluble.

      As the name implies, water-soluble vitamins such as most B and C vitamins dissolve in water. They are easily taken up and released by body tissues. Daily replenishment of these water soluble nutrients is important because the body cannot store them.

      Fat-soluble vitamins such as Vitamin A, D, E and K dissolve in fat. These vitamins are absorbed along with fat. Excess fat-soluble vitamins may be stored in the body fat and liver therefore several weeks' supply may be consumed in a single dose or meal.

    • What is the best way to take B vitamins?

      B vitamins may be more effective when taken together. B vitamins work synergistically and often times in similar roles. In general, proper function of a B vitamin is dependent upon the presence of other B complex vitamins.

       

      Nevertheless, a health care professional may suggests taking an individual B vitamin for specific reasons or conditions.

       

    • Are B vitamins safe?

      Yes, B Vitamins are water soluble and significant amounts are not stored in the body (with the exception of vitamins B6 and B12). The body will eliminate any excess taken in the diet. Most B vitamins have not shown toxicity at high doses except for Niacin and B6.

      Because water-soluble vitamins and nutrients dissolve in water, the human body requires a continuous supply from either food or supplements.

    • What vitamins make up the B complex vitamins?

      - Vitamin B1
      - Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin).
      - Vitamin B3 (Niacin)
      - Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)
      - Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)
      - Vitamin B7 (Biotin)
      - Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid)
      - Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin)

       

    • What are the main roles of each B vitamin?

      - B Vitamins are essential for a healthy metabolism, energy production, nervous system, and skin.
      - When taken together B vitamins work synergistically and may optimize the benefit.

      Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) for energy support

      - The first B vitamin discovered, hence the name. Thiamin is essential for proper energy production in the brain. It functions as part of the enzymatic process necessary for energy production.
      - Needed to process protein, carbohydrates and fat
      - Required by each cell to form ATP, the fuel used by the body to create energy
      - Required by nerve cells in order to function normally
      - Found in soybeans, legumes, brown rice, sunflower seeds, peanuts and fortified foods

      Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

      - First recognized as a yellow- green pigment in milk in 1879.Riboflavin functions with important enzymes involved in energy production.
      - Those likely to be deficient are vegans and those with sickle cell anemia
      - Needed to activate vitamin B6 and folic acid
      - Important in energy production
      - Found in dairy foods, eggs, meat and fortified foods

      Vitamin B3 (Niacin, Niacinamide) for circulatory support and blood vessel wellness. Supports healthy cholesterol levels and energy.

      - The body converts the amino acid tryptophan to create niacin. It is required in the process of releasing energy from carbohydrates. The niacin form of vitamin B3 also regulates cholesterol levels in the body.
      - Therapeutic doses of niacin are used to manage cholesterol and should be administered by a health care practitioner due to the possibility of liver toxicity.
      - Essential in the production of energy and to process alcohol
      - Functions therapeutically to promote heart health
      - Found in liver, organ meats, eggs, fish, peanuts, Brewer’s yeast and in smaller amounts in rice, seeds and barley

      Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) supports metabolism and adrenal function.

      Often used externally in hair care products, as well as taken internally. This vitamin plays a vital role in various enzymatic functions in the body:

      - Utilized in the breakdown of fats and carbohydrates
      - Important in the manufacture of adrenal hormones and red blood cells
      - Necessary for energy production
      - Required for proper function of the nervous system
      - Found in liver, yeast, salmon, vegetables, dairy, grains and eggs

      Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) plays an important role in converting food into energy. It is also essential in red blood cell formation, protein metabolism, and immune support

      Is required to process amino acids in the body. It is also needed to make the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, supporting nervous system health. Along with folic acid and B12, B6 is:

      - Directly related to homocysteine levels in body. Excess homocysteine buildup increases the risk of a heart attack- adequate levels of B6 assist in keeping homocysteine levels balanced
      - Crucial in maintaining hormone homeostasis, including melatonin production
      - Food sources of B6 include liver, organ meats, milk, fish, poultry, whole grains and legumes Deficiency of vitamin B6 may occur in anemic individuals and those using oral contraceptives. 0 -
      - Therapeutic uses for B6 include morning sickness, carpal tunnel syndrome, PMS and water balance.

      Vitamin B7 (Biotin) supports metabolism of food for energy. Promotes healthy skin, hair, and nails. Biotin functions in the utilization of fats and amino acids. Biotin can be manufactured in the gut.

      - Commonly used by those with alopecia (hair loss) and for nail health
      - Found in liver, soy, grains, nuts and brewer’s yeast
      - Found in clinical studies to help potentiate the action of the trace mineral chromium

      Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid) for fetal development support including spine and brain development.

      Folic Acid is the synthetic form of the vitamin, Folate. Folate is only found in foods. This vitamin is needed for energy production and the formation of red blood cells. Folic acid intake and cellular stores are most critical to:

      - Nervous system development of the fetus, especially in the beginning weeks of pregnancy
      - Reducing the risk of heart disease by keeping homocysteine levels in check
      - Found in orange juice, green leafy vegetables, whole grains, legumes and fortified cereals

      Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

      Works with folic acid to synthesize DNA, red blood cells, and nerve cells. Intrinsic factor, a special digestive secretion, is necessary to absorb vitamin B12 from food. Our formula B12 500 mcg is unique because it is protected with a special resin. This resin delays disintegration of the tablet until it reaches the small intestine. Once there, it breaks down, allowing for maximum absorption of this important nutrient. Other important factors include:

      - Works with vitamins B6 and folic acid to keep homocysteine levels in check
      - Stored in the liver
      - Found in animal sources, such as liver, kidney, eggs, cheese and meat

      PABA (Para- Aminobenzoic Acid)

      Functions in the breakdown and utilization of proteins and in the formation of blood cells. May play a role in:

      - Skin health
      - Intestinal health
      - Found in grains and meats

    • Does the Balanced B-50 Cap contain oxalate or any ingredient derived from oxalate?

       There is no oxalic acid in the Balanced B-50 Cap


    • What is the difference between niacin and niacinamide?

      Vitamin B3 comes in two natural forms: niacin (or nicotinic acid) and niacinamide. Niacin is easily converted into niacinamide in our body tissues. Thus, niacin is found in animal tissues as niacinamide and in plant tissues as nicotinic acid. The richest niacin sources are brewer’s yeast, red meat, poultry, fish, and peanuts. Niacin acts as a mild dilatory of blood vessels and increases blood flow. Depending on the individual, it may cause a temporary flushing of the face and increased skin temperature. Niacinamide has not been shown to cause these unpleasant reactions. Medical professionals may prescribe drug dosages of niacin since it has been positively associated with cholesterol levels. A few cases of liver toxicity have occurred in individuals taking drug dosages (greater than 2 grams prolonged release niacin/day).Therefore, a high niacin intake should only be taken under the supervision of a medical professional.

       

    • Is No-Flush Niacin timed release niacin?

      No. No-Flush Niacin is a completely different form of niacin than timed release. It is broken down more slowly by the digestive system and does not reach full blood serum levels for nearly ten hours after ingestion. This is actually a longer period of time than many timed release niacin supplements.

    • How much actual niacin am I getting in one dose of No-Flush Niacin?

      The inositol hexanicotinate used in No-Flush Niacin is 90.4% niacin and 9.6% inositol. If you do the math that breaks down to 454 mg of niacin and 46 mg of inositol per dose. This is over 2,000% of the recommended daily intake of niacin.


    • What is the difference between inositol hexaniacinate and inositol hexanicotinate?

      There is no difference. They are different names for the same molecular compound. It may be easiest to refer to it as no-flush niacin.

    • What does B6 do for the body?

      Vitamin B6 plays an important role in converting food into energy. It is also essential in red blood cell formation, protein metabolism, and immune support.

    • How much vitamin B6 do I need?

      The amount of vitamin B6 you need depends on your age. Average daily recommended amounts are listed below in milligrams (mg).

       

      Life Stage

      Recommended Amount

      Birth to 6 months

      0.1 mg

      Infants 7–12 months

      0.3 mg

      Children 1–3 years

      0.5 mg

      Children 4–8 years

      0.6 mg

      Children 9–13 years

      1.0 mg

      Teens 14–18 years (boys)

      1.3 mg

      Teens 14–18 years (girls)

      1.2 mg

      Adults 19–50 years

      1.3 mg

      Adults 51+ years (men)

      1.7 mg

      Adults 51+ years (women)

      1.5 mg

      Pregnant teens and women

      1.9 mg

      Breastfeeding teens and women

      2.0 mg

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

       

    • What foods provide vitamin B6?

      Vitamin B6 is found naturally in many foods and is added to other foods. You can get recommended amounts of vitamin B6 by eating a variety of foods, including the following:

      - Poultry, fish, and organ meats, all rich in vitamin B6.
      - Potatoes and other starchy vegetables, which are some of the major sources of vitamin B6 for Americans.
      - Fruit (other than citrus), which are also among the major sources of vitamin B6 for Americans.

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Am I getting enough vitamin B6?

      Certain groups of people are more likely than others to have trouble getting enough vitamin B6 namely:

      - People whose kidneys do not work properly, including people who are on kidney dialysis and those who -have had a kidney transplant.
      - People with autoimmune disorders, which cause their immune system to mistakenly attack their own healthy tissues. For example, people with rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, or inflammatory bowel disease sometimes have low vitamin B6 levels.
      - People with alcohol dependence.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • What happens if I don't get enough vitamin B6?

      People who don't get enough vitamin B6 can have a range of symptoms, including anemia, itchy rashes, scaly skin on the lips, cracks at the corners of the mouth, and a swollen tongue. Other symptoms of very low vitamin B6 levels include depression, confusion, and a weak immune system. Infants who do not get enough vitamin B6 can become irritable or develop extremely sensitive hearing or seizures.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Does vitamin B6 affect homocysteine levels in the blood?

      Recent studies indicate that the combination of Folic Acid, vitamins B6, and B12 helps maintain normal blood levels of homocysteine.

    • Can vitamin B6 be harmful?

      The upper limits for vitamin B6 are listed below. These levels do not apply to people who are taking vitamin B6 for medical reasons under the care of a doctor.

       

      Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (ULs) for Vitamin B6 [1]

      Age

      Male

      Female

      Pregnancy

      Lactation

      Birth to 6 months

      Not possible to establish*

      Not possible to establish*

       

       

      7–12 months

      Not possible to establish*

      Not possible to establish*

       

       

      1–3 years

      30 mg

      30 mg

       

       

      4–8 years

      40 mg

      40 mg

       

       

      9–13 years

      60 mg

      60 mg

       

       

      14–18 years

      80 mg

      80 mg

      80 mg

      80 mg

      19+ years

      100 mg

      100 mg

      100 mg

      100 mg

      *Breast milk, formula, and food should be the only sources of vitamin B6 for infants.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Are there any interactions with vitamin B6 that I should know about?

      Yes, vitamin B6 supplements can interact or interfere with medicines that you take. Here are several examples:

      - Vitamin B6 supplements might interact with cycloserine (Seromycin®), an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis, and worsen any seizures and nerve cell damage that the drug might cause.
      - Taking certain epilepsy drugs could decrease vitamin B6 levels and reduce the drugs' ability to control seizures.
      - Taking theophylline (Aquaphyllin®, Elixophyllin®, Theolair®, Truxophyllin®, and many others) for asthma or another lung disease can reduce vitamin B6 levels and cause seizures.

    • Is Biotin a Vitamin?

      Yes, biotin is also known as vitamin B7.

    • Does Biotin cause hair and nail growth?

      Biotin has not been proven to cause the growth of hair or nails. Nevertheless, it is needed to help maintain healthy hair, skin, and nails.

    • How Much Biotin is Safe to Take Daily?

      Currently, there is no evidence of biotin toxicity and no determined tolerable upper intake level (UL).

      There is no recommended dietary allowance (RDA) established for biotin. The adequate intakes (AI) for biotin are 7 mcg for infants 0-12 months, 8 mcg for children 1-3 years, 12 mcg for children 4-8 years, 20 mcg for children 9-13 years, 25 mcg for adolescents 14-18 years, 30 mcg for adults over 18 years and pregnant women, and 35 mcg for breast-feeding women. Please consult with your health care professional before using doses above 2,500 mcg.

    • What is folate and what does it do?

      Folate is a B-vitamin that is naturally present in many foods. A form of folate, called folic acid, is used in dietary supplements and fortified foods.

      Our bodies need folate to make DNA and other genetic material. Folate is also needed for the body's cells to divide.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • How much folate do I need?

      The amount of folate you need depends on your age. Average daily recommended amounts are listed below in micrograms (mcg) of dietary folate equivalents (DFEs).

      All women and teen girls who could become pregnant should consume 400 mcg of folic acid daily from supplements, fortified foods, or both in addition to the folate they get naturally from foods.

       

      Life Stage

      Recommended Amount

      Birth to 6 months

      65 mcg DFE

      Infants 7–12 months

      80 mcg DFE

      Children 1–3 years

      150 mcg DFE

      Children 4–8 years

      200 mcg DFE

      Children 9–13 years

      300 mcg DFE

      Teens 14–18 years

      400 mcg DFE

      Adults 19–50 years

      400 mcg DFE

      Adults 51–70 years

      400 mcg DFE

      Adults 71+ years

      400 mcg DFE

      Pregnant teens and women

      600 mcg DFE

      Breastfeeding teens and women

      500 mcg DFE

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

       

    • What foods provide folate?

      Folate is naturally present in many foods and food companies add folic acid to other foods, including bread, cereal, and pasta. You can get recommended amounts by eating a variety of foods, including the following:

      - Vegetables (especially asparagus, Brussels sprouts, and dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach and mustard greens).
      - Fruits and fruit juices (especially oranges and orange juice).
      - Nuts, beans, and peas (such as peanuts, black-eyed peas, and kidney beans).
      - Grains (including whole grains; fortified cold cereals; enriched flour products such as bread, bagels, cornmeal, and pasta; and rice).
      - Folic acid is added to many grain-based products. To find out whether folic acid has been added to a food, check the product label.
      - Beef liver is high in folate but is also high in cholesterol, so limit the amount you eat. Only small amounts of folate are found in other animal foods like meats, poultry, seafood, eggs, and dairy products.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • What kinds of folic acid dietary supplements are available?

      Folic acid is available in multivitamins and prenatal vitamins. It is also available in B-complex dietary supplements and supplements containing only folic acid.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Am I getting enough folate?

      Certain groups of people are more likely than others to have trouble getting enough folate:

      - Teen girls and women aged 14–30 years (especially before and during pregnancy).
      - Non-Hispanic black women.
      - People with disorders that lower nutrient absorption (such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease).
      - People with alcoholism.

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • What happens if I don't get enough folate?

      Folate deficiency is rare in the United States, but some people get barely enough. Getting too little folate can result in megaloblastic anemia, which causes weakness, fatigue, trouble concentrating, irritability, headache, heart palpitations, and shortness of breath. Folate deficiency can also cause open sores on the tongue and inside the mouth as well as changes in the color of the skin, hair, or fingernails.

       

      Women who don't get enough folate are at risk of having babies with neural tube defects, such asspina bifida. Folate deficiency can also increase the likelihood of having a premature or low-birth-weight baby.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Can folate be harmful?

      Folate that is naturally present in food is not harmful. Folic acid in supplements and fortified foods, however, should not be consumed in amounts above the upper limit, unless recommended by a health care provider.

      Taking large amounts of folic acid might hide a vitamin B12 deficiency. Folic acid can correct the anemia but not the nerve damage caused by vitamin B12 deficiency. This can lead to permanent damage of the brain, spinal cord, and nerves. High doses of folic acid might also increase the risk of colorectal cancer and possibly other cancers in some people.

      The upper limits for folic acid are listed below.

      Ages

      Upper Limit

      Birth to 6 months

      Not established

      Infants 7–12 months

      Not established

      Children 1–3 years

      300 mcg

      Children 4–8 years

      400 mcg

      Children 9–13 years

      600 mcg

      Teens 14–18 years

      800 mcg

      Adults

      1,000 mcg

       

    • Are there any interactions with folate that I should know about?

      Folic acid supplements can interact with several medications. Here are some examples:

      • Folic acid could interfere with methotrexate (Rheumatrex®, Trexall®) when taken to treat cancer.
      • Taking anti-epileptic medications such as phenytoin (Dilantin®), carbamazepine (Carbatrol®, Tegretol®, Equetro®, Epitol®), and valproate (Depacon®) could reduce blood levels of folate. Also, taking folic acid supplements could reduce blood levels of these medications.
      • Taking sulfasalazine (Azulfidine®) for ulcerative colitis could reduce the body's ability to absorb folate and cause folate deficiency.

      Tell your doctor, pharmacist, and other health care providers about any dietary supplements and medicines you take. They can tell you if those dietary supplements might interact or interfere with your prescription or over-the-counter medicines or if the medicines might interfere with how your body absorbs, uses, or breaks down nutrients.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements


    • What is vitamin B12 and what does it do?

      Vitamin B12 is a nutrient that helps keep the body's nerve and blood cells healthy and helps make DNA, the genetic material in all cells. Vitamin B12 also helps prevent a type of anemia called megaloblastic anemia that makes people tired and weak.

      Two steps are required for the body to absorb vitamin B12 from food. First, hydrochloric acid in the stomach separates vitamin B12 from the protein to which vitamin B12 is attached in food. After this, vitamin B12 combines with a protein made by the stomach called intrinsic factor and is absorbed by the body. Some people have pernicious anemia, a condition where they cannot make intrinsic factor. As a result, they have trouble absorbing vitamin B12 from all foods and dietary supplements.

       

    • What type of cobalamin do you use?

      All of our vitamin B12 products are in the cyanocobalamin form.

    • What does double absorption on the front of the B12, 500 mcg label mean?

      Our “double absorption” vitamin B12 undergoes a unique production process. But first, it is important to understand the absorption and transportation of B12 in the body.

      B12 (cyanocobalamin) is synthesized by microorganisms in our gastrointestinal tract, and it occurs as part of a protein complex in animal proteins.B12 absorption involves the following steps:

      1.  Ingested B12 is broken down by enzymes and hydrochloric acid.
      2.  B12 then binds with an R protein and is transported from the stomach to the small intestine. R proteins are found in saliva and gastric juices. Once in the small intestine, B12 is released.
      3. The unbound cobalamin then binds to another specific protein called Intrinsic Factor (IF), which is necessary for the absorption of B12 in the small intestine.
      4. After crossing the intestinal lining, B12 breaks off from the IF and binds to still another carrier protein. The protein, transcobalamin, transports vitamin B12 to the bloodstream.

      We can find no documentation that shows B12 is better absorbed if it combines with the R protein in the saliva versus in the stomach.

      The specially processed cobalamin in B12, 500 mcg contains a resin that responds to particular pH levels. As the tablet disintegrates, the nutrient is protected by the resin until it reaches the small intestine. It is here where the pH is high enough to allow the resin to release the B12.This process can essentially double the absorption of vitamin B12.That’s why we call our formula “double absorption” B12.

    • How is Methyl B12 absorbed differently than cyanocobalamin?

      Cyanocobalamin, the most common form of vitamin B12, is taken orally where it travels to the stomach. Here, Intrinsic Factor (IF) and adequate stomach acid separate B12 from food and cyanocobalamin is then broken down as cyano + cobalamin. This free cobalamin needs to be methylated (a methyl group needs to attach) to be distributed in the blood. Methyl groups can come from betaine or other methyl-containing compounds. In contrast, methylcobalamin simply gets absorbed via the intestines and then is circulated into the blood-eliminating the step to wait for methylation of the molecule

    • How much vitamin B12 do I need?

      The amount of vitamin B12 you need each day depends on your age. Average daily recommended amounts for different ages are listed below in micrograms (mcg):

       

      Life Stage

      Recommended Amount

      Birth to 6 months

      0.4 mcg

      Infants 7–12 months

      0.5 mcg

      Children 1–3 years

      0.9 mcg

      Children 4–8 years

      1.2 mcg

      Children 9–13 years

      1.8 mcg

      Teens 14–18 years

      2.4 mcg

      Adults

      2.4 mcg

      Pregnant teens and women

      2.6 mcg

      Breastfeeding teens and women

      2.8 mcg

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Am I getting enough vitamin B12?

      Some people have trouble absorbing vitamin B12 from food. As a result, vitamin B12 deficiency affects up to 15% of the public. 

      Certain groups may not get enough vitamin B12 or have trouble absorbing it:

      - Many older adults, who do not have enough hydrochloric acid in their stomach to absorb the vitamin B12 naturally present in food. People over 50 should get most of their vitamin B12 from fortified foods or dietary supplements because, in most cases, their bodies can absorb vitamin B12 from these sources.
      - People with pernicious anemia whose bodies do not make the intrinsic factor needed to absorb vitamin B12. Doctors usually treat pernicious anemia with vitamin B12 shots, although very high oral doses of vitamin B12 might also be effective.
      - People who have had gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight loss surgery, or who have digestive disorders, such as celiac disease or Crohn's disease. These conditions can decrease the amount of vitamin B12 that the body can absorb.
      - Some people who eat little or no animal foods such as vegetarians and vegans. Only animal foods have vitamin B12 naturally. When pregnant women and women who breastfeed their babies are strict vegetarians or vegans, their babies might also not get enough vitamin B12.
       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Can vitamin B12 be harmful?

      Vitamin B12 has not been shown to cause any harm. Vitamin B-12 is water soluble, so what your body does not use is eliminated through the urine. Vitamin B-12 is non-toxic even at many times greater than the Recommended Daily Allowance

    • What happens if I don't get enough vitamin B12?

      Vitamin B12 deficiency causes tiredness, weakness, constipation, loss of appetite, weight loss, and megaloblastic anemia. Nerve problems, such as numbness and tingling in the hands and feet, can also occur. Other symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include problems with balance, depression, confusion, dementia, poor memory, and soreness of the mouth or tongue. Vitamin B12 deficiency can damage the nervous system even in people who don't have anemia, so it is important to treat a deficiency as soon as possible.

      In infants, signs of a vitamin B12 deficiency include failure to thrive, problems with movement, delays in reaching the typical developmental milestones, and megaloblastic anemia.

      Large amounts of folic acid can hide a vitamin B12 deficiency by correcting megaloblastic anemia, a hallmark of vitamin B12 deficiency. But folic acid does not correct the progressive damage to the nervous system that vitamin B12 deficiency also causes. For this reason, healthy adults should not get more than 1,000 mcg of folic acid a day.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

       

    • Are there any interactions with vitamin B12 that I should know about?

      Yes. Vitamin B12 can interact or interfere with medicines that you take, and in some cases, medicines can lower vitamin B12 levels in the body. Here are several examples of medicines that can interfere with the body's absorption or use of vitamin B12:\

      - Chloramphenicol (Chloromycetin®), an antibiotic that is used to treat certain infections.
      - Proton pump inhibitors, such as omeprazole (Prilosec®) and lansoprazole (Prevacid®), that are used to treat acid reflux and peptic ulcer disease.
      - Histamine H2 receptor antagonists, such as cimetidine (Tagamet®), famotidine (Pepcid®), and ranitidine (Zantac®), that are used to treat peptic ulcer disease.
      - Metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes.

      Tell your doctor, pharmacist, and other health care providers about any dietary supplements and medicines you take. They can tell you if those dietary supplements might interact or interfere with your prescription or over-the-counter medicines or if the medicines might interfere with how your body absorbs, uses, or breaks down nutrients.
       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

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