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PRODUCT SUMMARY

Multi-Vitamin - Prenatal Women's Multi with DHA Veg Tabs (90 Count)

Availability: In stock
Stock Number :MIT-106-VT-090
  • General Health and Wellness
  • Immune Support
  • Quick Notes:

    • Women's, comprehensive, broad spectrum, vegetarian prenatal multivitamin formulation features twenty five (25) different nutrients (vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants)!

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    Product Information

    Quick Notes:

    • Women's, comprehensive, broad spectrum, vegetarian prenatal multivitamin formulation features twenty five (25) different nutrients (vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants)!
    • Special prenatal formulation with essential nutrients for optimal women’s health!
    • Contains proper nutrient amounts tailored to women of childbearing age - reflects current science-based recommendations!
    • Carefully chosen formula uses only beta-carotene as the vitamin A source!
    • Health officials suggest women who are pregnant, may become pregnant, and those lactating should consume a multivitamin!
    • Three a day formula designed to supplement each meal to ensure even absorption!
    • Unique prenatal multivitamins formula has added DHA and choline!
    • DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid) supports normal healthy brain function, cognitive function, and brain development!
    • DHA also supports the nervous system and visual health! DHA makes up part of the cell membranes in neural and retinal tissue!
    • One critical period for acquiring omega 3 fatty acids is during fetal development in the womb. The other critical period for acquiring omega 3 fatty acids is after birth until the brain and retina have fully developed.
    • Molecular distillation process removes pollutants such as heavy metals (i.e. mercury, lead, arsenic, and cadmium), PCBs, and dioxins from the DHA source!
    • Does not contain fish allergen often found in other prenatal multi-vitamins!
    • Includes Choline - another nutrient that is very important for pregnant women, yet difficult to obtain in the diet!
    • Research indicates that high amounts of choline are transferred from the mother to the fetus and (and later, to the breastfeeding baby), which may deplete the mother’s choline stores if her diet is low!
    • Folic acid and iron are particularly important to women who are pregnant, may become pregnant, and or lactating!
    • Like folic acid, choline is key for fetal, infant brain, and nervous system development!
    • Features Vitamin A, Vitamin C, eight (8) various B vitamins, Vitamin D3, and Vitamin E!
    • Ten (10) different trace elements and minerals!
    • Citrus bioflavonoids added as a broad spectrum potent antioxidant!


    Overview:

    Our Prenatal Multi with DHA is a comprehensive, high potency, high quality, vegetarian formula that provides essential vitamins and minerals.

    Pregnant women have special nutritional needs! It is of utmost importance for expecting mothers to get the vital vitamins and minerals not only for themselves, but for the unborn child as well. The developing baby gets all of his/her nutrition through the mother; therefore, extra care must be taken to ensure there are no nutritional gaps.This Prenatal Multi with DHA is specifically formulated to give expecting mothers the daily nutrition required - in dosage levels that are safe for the mother and child. Health officials suggest women who are pregnant, may become pregnant, and those lactating should consume a multivitamin. A product providing basic nutritional needs—especially proper amounts of folic acid and iron—are key for supporting a healthy pregnancy.

    In recent years, researchers have paid closer attention to how omega 3 fatty acids, in particular docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), play a role in both maternal and fetal health. DHA makes up part of the cell membranes in neural and retinal tissue. One of the two critical periods for acquiring omega 3 fatty acids is during fetal development in the womb (the other is after birth until the brain and retina have fully developed). Research in humans has shown that pregnant women who were given fish oil or sardines had higher DHA concentrations in maternal plasma, red blood cells, cord blood plasma, and red blood cells at time of birth than those not administered these fats.

    Choline is another nutrient very important for pregnant women, yet difficult to obtain in the diet. Like folic acid, choline is key for fetal and infant brain and nervous system development. Research shows that high amounts of choline are transferred from the mother to the fetus and (and later, to the breastfeeding baby), which may deplete the mother’s choline stores if her diet is low. The Institute of Medicine’s Dietary Reference Intakes for pregnant women are 450 mg choline per day (550 mg per day for lactating women). Our Prenatal with DHA provides 50 mg DHA and 150 mg choline per three tablets.

    Ingredients

    Ascorbic Acid

    Beta Carotene

    Biotin

    Biotin

    Vitamin H

    coenzyme R

    or Vitamin B7

    Calcium

    Calcium Citrate

    Cholecalciferol

    Choline

    Choline Bitartrate

    Chromax

    Chromium

    Chromium Picolinate

    coenzyme R

    Copper

    Copper Gluconate

    D-alpha tocopherol succinate

    DHA

    Iodine

    Iron

    Magnesium

    Magnesium Citrate

    Manganese

    Niacin

    niacinamide

    Pantothenic Acid Or VitaminB5

    Riboflavin

    Thiamin

    Thiamin

    Vitamin B1

    thiamine mononitrate

    Vitamin B1

    Vitamin B12

    vitamin b12 or cyanocobalamin

    Vitamin B2

    Vitamin B3

    Vitamin B5

    Vitamin B6

    vitamin b6 or pyridoxine

    Vitamin B7

    Vitamin D3

    Vitamin E

    Vitamin H

    Zinc

    Zinc Gluconate

    Suggested Use: Take 3 tablets daily divided among meals. Pair with a calcium supplement to meet the full recommended intake.

    Storage: Keep in a cool, dry place

    Allergy Warnings:

    This product is contraindicated for individuals with hypersensitivity to any of its ingredients.

    Interactions:

    • Everyone has unique body chemistry. All patients should be aware of potential drug and supplement interaction. You are encouraged to consult with your primary health care professional before taking any supplement product.

    • This product contains multiple ingredients. Please refer to the individual vitamin or mineral product page for interaction information. Always consult with your primary care professional before taking any supplement product.

    Pregnancy Warning:

    If you are pregnant, nursing, have any health condition, or are taking any medications please consult with your health care practitioner before using this product.

    Keep out of reach of children.

    Disclaimer:

    • The following scientific literature references, articles, and statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
    • This product is not intended to treat, cure or prevent any disease.
    • Information about this product is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.
    THANKS!
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    2.     Ramakrishnan U, Aburto N, McCabe G, et al. Multimicronutrient interventions but not vitamin a or iron interventions alone improve child growth: results of 3 meta-analyses. J Nutr. 2004;134:2592-602.

    3.     Benton D. Micro-nutrient supplementation and the intelligence of children. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2001;25:297-309

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    FAQ

    Frequently Asked Questions - Multi-Vitamin

    • What are the benefits of taking a multivitamin?

      Multivitamins are intended to be used as part of an overall healthy lifestyle that includes proper diet and exercise. Multivitamins can help fill the gaps in one’s diet. This will help ensure you get the recommended amount of key vitamins and minerals needed each day.

    • What are vitamins?

      Vitamins are naturally occurring compounds present in foods. The human body cannot create vitamins and therefore has to acquire them via the diet or supplements. Vitamins are essential for all body functions including: obtaining energy from food, supporting growth, repairing tissues, maintenance of health, and general wellness.

    • Why are vitamins important?

      Our bodies utilize vitamins on a daily basis. These vitamins are critical for biochemical processes that maintain life. Vitamins play important roles in obtaining energy from our food, supporting growth, healing, and repair. A continuous deficiency in vitamins will lead to a serious deterioration in health, weakness, susceptibility to disease, and may lead to death.


    • How many vitamins are there?

      Thirteen vitamins have been identified: A, B (8 variations) C, D, E, and K. B complex vitamins are as follows: Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B3 (Niacin), Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid), Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine), Vitamin B7 (Biotin), Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid), and Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin).

    • What is the difference between water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins

      Vitamins are divided into two groups: water-soluble and fat-soluble.

      As the name implies, water-soluble vitamins such as most B and C vitamins dissolve in water. They are easily taken up and released by body tissues. Daily replenishment of these water soluble nutrients is important because the body cannot store them.

      Fat-soluble vitamins such as Vitamin A, D, E and K dissolve in fat. These vitamins are absorbed along with fat. Excess fat-soluble vitamins may be stored in the body fat and liver therefore several weeks' supply may be consumed in a single dose or meal.

    • What can happen in instances of vitamin deficiency?

      Deficiencies in vitamins can cause serious problems.

      - Vitamin A deficiencies can result in problems with vision and eye lesions.
      - Vitamin B1 or Thiamin deficiencies can result in beriberi.
      - Vitamin B3 or Niacin deficiencies can result in gastrointestinal disturbances, erythema, nervous disorders, mental disorders, and or pellagra
      - Vitamin C deficiencies can result in scurvy.
      - Vitamin D deficiencies can result in rickets.

    • What can cause vitamin deficiencies?

      Vitamin deficiencies can be caused by a number of factors including but not limited to

      - Inadequate food intake
      - Unbalanced diet.
      - Poor absorption and digestion
      - Increased vitamin requirements due to age
      - Increased vitamin needs due to life-style

    • Is it possible to have low vitamin levels and be unaware?

      Yes, it is possible to have low vitamins levels and be unaware. Many Americans are deficient in one or more vitamins. There are a few indications of low vitamin levels such as fatigue, poor concentration, irritability, sluggishness, insomnia, and loss of appetite.

    • Is it possible to be overweight and still have low vitamin levels?

      Yes, it is possible to be overweight and have low levels of vitamins and nutrients. Foods that are high in calories are often low in nutrients, vitamins, and minerals.

    • Are extra vitamins recommended in times of physical stress?

      Yes, the body requires more vitamins during physical stress.

    • What groups of individuals are at risk for vitamin deficiency?

      - Women who plan to become pregnant
      - Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding their infant
      - Newborn and premature infants
      - Children and adolescents in periods of rapid growth.
      - Women taking oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy
      - People in advanced ages
      - Smokers
      - People recovering from surgery or illness.
      - People who are long-term users of certain medications
      - Dieters with low caloric intakes.
      - Individuals in the lower income range

    • Why have you added lutein and lycopene to your Softgel Multi?

      Lutein is a beneficial antioxidant involved in maintaining the health of the macula, a protective shield behind the cornea that guards against harmful blue light. Adequate lutein is rarely achieved through diet, and it has become a popular ingredient in several multivitamins. We use FloraGLO® and LuteMax™ 2020 brand luteins, both sourced from marigold flowers. Lycopene, an antioxidant found most abundantly in tomatoes and tomato products, is another popular ingredient in several multivitamins. Its activity has been linked to prostate health as well as other men’s health issues. Interestingly, lycopene activity has been found to be greater in processed and heated tomato products such as tomato sauce and ketchup than in raw tomatoes. We use Lyc-O-Mato® brand lycopene, in which lycopene is suspended in tomato oil, thereby enhancing its bioavailability.

    • What are the sources of calcium stearate and stearic acid in Iron Free Basic Multi®?

      Calcium stearate comes from limestone and stearic acid comes from palm kernel oil extracted from the fruit seeds of the palm tree.

       

    • Why does our Men’s 45+ Multi have iron? Shouldn’t it be iron-free?

      While many advanced-age men do not require high amounts of iron consumption, some iron is still essential for proper health (it is an integral part of protein, enzymes and oxygen transport). A large amount of this older population suffers from ulcers or other gastric bleeding from chronic NSAID (Non-Steroidal Anti- Inflammatory Drugs) use, which lowers serum iron and often results in iron-deficiency anemia in these otherwise healthy men. For those who are active and engage in exercise, iron requirements may actually increase by 30% in those individuals. Finally, many older adults eat less (in general), so their iron intake from food is less than that of the general population. The iron in the Men’s 45+ Multi is only 22% of the RDI for iron (4 mg). The NIH states there is still insufficient evidence to come to a conclusion about high iron intake and heart disease. The Tolerable Upper Limit (TUL) intake for men over age 19 is 45 mg iron per day.

    • Do I need to take another multi, if I’m taking Hair, Skin & Nails Multi?

      Our Hair, Skin & Nails Multi is based on our best-selling Basic Multi® which is a great foundation for nutrition needs. However, in addition to basic nutrients, our Hair, Skin & Nails Multi has added specialty antioxidants for skin and overall cellular health. It also contains silica, MSM and amino acids for collagen support. Collagen is responsible for skin’s resiliency and elasticity, but its production slows as we age.

    • What are the sources of enzymes in the Men’s and Women’s Multis?

      They are from fermentation from fungal sources Aspergillus oryzae, Rhizopus oryzae, and contain beet root fiber (Beta vulgaris L.).

    • What is ORAC?

      ORAC stands for Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity. It measures how much a particular substance has the ability to absorb a free radical using Vitamin E as the baseline. First developed at the National Institute on Aging at the National Institute of Health and later refined at the USDA, values are assigned to fruits and vegetables based on their ability to quench oxygen radicals. Higher levels mean a food has a high potency of antioxidant activity. Foods with the highest ORAC levels include prunes, chocolate, raisins, cranberries, blueberries, plums, blackberries, kale and spinach. We also have a high-ORAC fruit blend in our children’s chewable, Bengal Bites®.

       

       

    • Why do I need to take more calcium if I’m taking the Prenatal Once Daily?

      We recommend women relying on our Prenatal Once Daily consume additional calcium since Prenatal Once Daily only supplies 232 milligrams per tablet (meeting only 18% of the daily value).Adequate calcium intake is essential for the healthy growth and function of the fetus, as well as the mother.

    • Is the DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) in your Prenatal with DHA made with a hexane-free process?

      Yes, the manufacturer of the DHA material has provided us documentation that they use a completely solvent-free process.

    • At what age should Teen Multi be taken?

      There’s no formal definition for what age range encompasses the adolescent years, but the Institute of Medicine outlines each age range and their specific nutrient needs. This chart is available online (or ask us for a copy). It’s up to the pediatrician and/or parents to decide what is right for them. See www.fnic.nal.usda.gov and search for the IOM tables

    • How does Teen Multi differ from an adult multi?

      Teen Multi Once Daily doesn’t have excessive amounts of micronutrients like many adult formulas do. Thus, it provides a base amount of nutrition for this age group without overloading them. It also offers more food-based ingredients since teen diets typically lack green veggies and fruit!

    • Why does Softgel Multi have such an unusual color?

      It is a combination of the vitamins and minerals included in Softgel Multi that give it its dark brown color. We also do not use any artificial coloring, such as caramel color, carob, or any other opacity agents to cover up the color of our vitamins. This may also be the reason that different batches of this product may differ slightly in color and appearance

    • What is the source of the base of bioflavonoids in the Iron Free Basic Multi®?

      They come from lemons only

    • If you use no artificial colors, how do Bengal Bites® get their tiger-like coloring?

      We have added a small amount of turmeric to give our children’s vitamins their color. There is not enough in the formula to really affect the taste, but the coloring is noticeable.

    • Can vitamins be made in the body?

      Yes, in a few instances vitamins can be made in the body. Vitamin D, Vitamin K, and niacin can be made in our bodies. Nevertheless, neither Vitamin D nor niacin are made in sufficient amounts. These vitamins must be obtained from food or supplements. Vitamin K is produced by beneficial bacteria in the adult intestinal tract. Nevertheless, infants do not have the established microflora and require additional Vitamin K.


    • Can one meet the vitamin requirements with food alone?

      Yes, one can meet the vitamin requirements with a proper and well balanced meal. The USDA Food Guide Pyramid recommends the following daily intake.

      However, if you eat fewer than the recommended servings and do not consume foods from all of the major food groups you may not be getting the adequate amount of vitamins and nutrients from food alone.

      Fats, oils and sweets:  Use sparingly              

      Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese: 2-3 servings
      1 cup of milk or yogurt, 1.5 ounces of natural cheese, 2 ounces of processed cheese

      Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts: 2-3 servings
      2-3 ounces of cooked lean meat, poultry, or fish – 1/2 cup of cooked dry beans, 1 egg, or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter count as 1 ounce of lean meat

      Vegetables:  3-5 servings
      1 cup of raw leafy vegetables 1/2 cup of other vegetables, cooked or chopped raw 3/4 cup of vegetable juice

      Fruit:  2-4 servings
      1 medium apple, banana, orange, etc., 1/2 cup of chopped, cooked, or canned fruit, 3/4 cup of fruit juice

      Bread, Cereal, Rice, and Pasta:  6-11 servings
      1 slice of bread, 1 ounce of ready-to-eat cereal, 1/2 cup of cooked cereal, rice, or pasta)

    • Is the time of day that you take vitamin supplements important?

      Certain nutrients enhance the absorption of others. For example, vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and vitamin C aids iron (non-heme) absorption. Consequently, it is best to take an iron supplement with a source of vitamin C and calcium with Vitamin D.

    • Do fruits and vegetables vary in vitamin content?

      Yes, fruits and vegetables vary in vitamin content. Vitamin content of foods can fluctuate based on soil conditions, soil nutrient levels, availability of water, climate, sun exposure, harvesting methods, ripeness, transportation, and storage.

       

    • Does food lose some of its vitamin content when stored?

      Yes, foods can lose vitamin content when stored and cooked. Ideally one should eat the freshest foods as quickly as possible to obtain the most nutrients. The amount of vitamin loss is highly dependent upon storage conditions and the food involved

    • Do fruits and vegetables vary in vitamin content?

      Yes, fruits and vegetables vary in vitamin content. Vitamin content of foods can fluctuate based on soil conditions, soil nutrient levels, availability of water, climate, sun exposure, harvesting methods, ripeness, transportation, and storage.

       

    • Does food lose some of its vitamin content when stored?

      Yes, foods can lose vitamin content when stored and cooked. Ideally one should eat the freshest foods as quickly as possible to obtain the most nutrients. The amount of vitamin loss is highly dependent upon storage conditions and the food involved.

       

    • Does food lose some of its vitamin content when cooked or prepared?

      Yes, vitamins are sensitive to heat, humidity, light, and air. Cooking foods may destroy vitamins

    • Does processing destroy the vitamins in food?

      Yes, vitamins are sensitive to heat, humidity, light, and air. Cooking foods may destroy vitamins.

       

    • Do vitamins give you energy?

      People who have an unbalanced daily diet or do not get enough nutrients throughout the day may suffer from fatigue. In this case, taking vitamin supplements may help restore energy.

       

      Certain vitamins help convert food into energy which the body needs to stay healthy and maintain homeostasis. 

       

    • Are vitamins fattening?

      No. Vitamins do not have a caloric value. In general, vitamins help convert food into energy which your body needs to stay healthy and maintain homeostasis. 

    • Are there any interactions with multivitamins that I should know about?

      Multivitamins with recommended intake levels of nutrients don't usually interact with medications, with one important exception. If you take medicine to reduce blood clotting, such as warfarin (Coumadin® and other brand names), talk to your health care provider before taking any Multi-vitamins or dietary supplement with vitamin K. Vitamin K lowers the drug's effectiveness and doctors base the medicine dose partly on the amount of vitamin K you usually consume in foods and supplements.

       

      Source: National Institute of Health – Office of Dietary Supplements

    • Does medication affect vitamin requirements?

      Yes, some medications may disturb the vitamin balance and may inhibit the ability to absorb, use, or store vitamins. Some examples are: aspirins, oral contraceptives, laxatives, statins, anticonvulsants, and certain antibiotics.

       

      Ask your health care practitioner about potential interactions with vitamins and other nutrients.

       

       

    • How do prenatal multivitamins support my health during pregnancy?

      Daily nutritional requirements such as folic acid, calcium, and iron increase during pregnancy. This is to help support the developing baby as well as the increased demands on a woman’s body.

       

      Our Prenatal Multivitamin is a comprehensive multivitamin complete with DHA. It is designed to meet your nutritional needs before, during, and after pregnancy (while breastfeeding). The formulation is designed to be taken three times per day. This way the prenatal multi can supplement each meal and ensure optimum absorption. The formulation also provides 100% of the daily value of folic acid. Proper levels of folic acid along with other nutrients may help to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. Furthermore, the prenatal multivitamin with DHA from algae supports the baby’s healthy eye and brain development*. Don’t forget to pair with a calcium supplement to meet the full recommended intake.

    • How does a prenatal multivitamin support the healthy growth and development of a baby?

      Daily nutritional requirements such as folic acid, calcium, and iron increase during pregnancy. This is to help support the developing baby as well as the increased demands on a woman’s body.

      Our Prenatal Multivitamin is a comprehensive multivitamin complete with DHA. It is designed to meet your nutritional needs before, during, and after pregnancy (while breastfeeding). The formulation is designed to be taken three times per day. This way the prenatal multi can supplement each meal and ensure optimum absorption. The formulation also provides 100% of the daily value of folic acid. Proper levels of folic acid along with other nutrients may help to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. Furthermore, the prenatal multivitamin with DHA from algae supports the baby’s healthy eye and brain development*. Our women’s prenatal multivitamin with DHA should be paired with a calcium supplement to meet the full recommended intake.

       

    • Why should I take a prenatal multivitamin if I am thinking of becoming pregnant?

      Birth defects and irregularities can form early in pregnancy before a woman realizes she is pregnant. If you are taking a prenatal multivitamin with folic acid and iron, you are helping ensure that your baby gets the nutrients needed for proper development.

    • Why should I take a prenatal multivitamin after pregnancy?

      Prenatal multivitamins may be taken after pregnancy, while you are breastfeeding. A mother’s nutritional needs remain heightened during breastfeeding.

    • Can children take the adult multivitamin tablets?

      No, our adult vitamins are formulated for adults 18 years and older. Children ages 3 and up can take our Bengal Bites® Children’s Chewable multivitamin.

    • Is there a risk of vitamin poisoning among young children?

      Vitamin supplements should be kept well out of the reach of children since swallowing several pills could be harmful, depending on the child's age. Iron supplements can cause toxicity in children.

    • Why do teenagers need more vitamins than adults?

      Teenagers require more energy to fuel development. Unfortunately many teenagers do not consume a balanced diet.

    • Could teenagers benefit from vitamin supplements?

      Vitamin supplementation may be suitable for teenagers who are vegetarians, do not consume a balanced diet (‘picky eaters’), are active in sports, or dine out frequently.

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